Truth and Method by Hans-Georg Gadamer

Truth and Method

Truth and Method (German: Wahrheit und Methode) is a 1960 book by Hans-Georg Gadamer, his major philosophical work.[1] In Truth and Method, Gadamer deploys the concept of “philosophical hermeneutics” as it is worked out in Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time (1927).

Gadamer draws heavily on the ideas of Romantic hermeneuticists such as Friedrich Schleiermacher and the work of later hermeneuticists such as Wilhelm Dilthey. He rejects as unachievable the goal of objectivity, and instead suggests that meaning is created through intersubjective communication.


Book Details

Author: Hans-Georg Gadamer
Print Length: 637
Publisher: Continuum
Original source: https://mvlindsey.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/truth-and-method-gadamer-2004.pdf
Submitted by: Robert
Book format: Pdf
Language: English
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The Golden Path: Interviews with Disciples of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother

The Golden Path

Interviews with Disciples of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother
from the Sri Aurobindo Ashram and Auroville

World-teachers Sri Aurobindo and The Mother have laid down a revolutionary spiritual path envisaging as its goal a Divine Life on earth.

During their lifetimes, a growing number of people gathered around them to receive guidance in their yoga of integral transformation. The author herself spent several years at the Sri Aurobindo Ashram while The Mother was alive and formed lasting bonds within the collective life there.

Today the Gurus are no longer in the physical but increasing numbers worldwide are being drawn to their yoga. Their ashram in Pondicherry, India and the nearby planetary city of Auroville continue to be vibrant expressions and embodiments of their teachings. Today, the recipients of their living Grace are anchors of the Light and are empowered to convey the contagion of their inspiration to countless many who have never been in their physical presence.

The author has interviewed twelve such disciples and, in these interviews, has drawn out the thread of the spiritual life that has grown in them through their contact with the Masters. Their sharing opens up multiple windows into a world of beauty, delight and joy kindled by the practice of Integral Yoga and graced by Sri Aurobindo and The Mother.


Book Details

Author: Anie Nunnally
Print Length: 264
Publisher: East-West Cultural Center
Submitted by: website visitor
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi
Language: English
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A Comparative Study of the Educational Philosophies of Sri Aurobindo and Maria Montessori

A Comparative Study of the Educational Philosophies
of Sri Aurobindo and Maria Montessori

In 1975, Aleta You Mastny wrote this dissertation, “A Comparative Study of the Educational Philosophies of Sri Aurobindo and Maria Montessori”, as a part of the requirements for her Doctor of Philosophy degree. In this paper, Mastny presents a detailed examination of the educational philosophies of two important pioneers in the field of childhood education.

Maria Montessori was a truly remarkable woman who was born in August 31, 1870, and was educated in Italy. Beginning her higher education in the field of engineering, she later switched to medicine. After earning her medical degree, she becoming an expert in pediatric medicine and went on to conceptualize her own methods of applying the educational theories first put forth by French physicians Jean-Marc-Gaspard Itard and Édouard Séguin. Her success in education came form her application of a religious, if not wholly spiritual, perspective, to the practical knowledge she developed in close observation of childhood development.

Sri Aurobindo was a most remarkable man born in India on August 15, 1872 and classically educated in England. When he returned to India, he fought for the independence of India as a political leader and went on to become a well respected spiritual leader, establishing an ashram with his collaborator, Mira Alfassa (The Mother). While overseeing a growing community in the ashram, Sri Aurobindo and The Mother developed and implemented their own ideas about childhood education.

In this insightful paper, Mastny finds many important parallels between Montessori’s theories and those of Sri Aurobindo. Despite the scholarly form of this dissertation, fans and followers of Sri Aurobindo are sure to find this work interesting. It also has a five-page bibliography.


Book Details

Author: Aleta You Mastny
Print Length: 145
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses
Submitted by: Blindshiva
Book format: Pdf
Language: English
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The Birth of the Clinic by Michel Foucault

The Birth of the Clinic

Developing the themes explored in his previous work, Madness and Civilization, Foucault traces the development of the medical profession, and specifically the institution of the clinique (translated as “clinic”, but here largely referring to teaching hospitals). Its central points are the concept of the medical regard (“medical gaze”) and the sudden re-organisation of knowledge at the end of the 18th century, which would be expanded in his next major work, The Order of Things.


Book Details

Author: Michel Foucault
Print Length: 238
Publisher: Routledge
Original source: https://monoskop.org/images/9/92/Foucault_Michel_The_Birth_of_the_Clinic_1976.pdf
Submitted by: Robert
Book format: Pdf
Language: English
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Death Dying and Beyond: The Science and Spirituality of Death

Death Dying and Beyond:
The Science and Spirituality of Death

Man’s paradoxical relation to death is that he sees the fact of death all around him, yet lives as if he were immortal. He may struggle to understand, wandering from the material scientist to the mystic in search of the secret meaning of death. In this book the author examines the complex questions on the nature of death, and follows Sri Aurobindo’s deeper vision behind the veil of death to find the answers to some of the most perplexing ethical and existential problems related to death, dying and the beyond.


Book Details

Author: Alok Pandey
Print Length: 293
Publisher: Sri Aurobindo Society
Contributors: Alexey Zheleznyak
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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The Future Evolution of Man

The Future Evolution of Man

Man today is becoming poignantly aware of his power to influence for good or evil his own destiny. At this critical moment when he questions his future, we believe it important to present to the public the most significant passages from those books of Sri Aurobindo which deal with this problem, the future evolution of humanity.


Book Details

Compiler: Pavitra (P.B. Saint-Hilaire)
Author: Sri Aurobindo
Print Length: 160
Publisher: Auro e-Books
Submitted by: Krishna
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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The Mother’s Vision

The Mother’s Vision

This book contains a selection of the Mother’s conversations during the periods 1929-31 and 1950-58. Speaking to members of the Sri Aurobindo Ashram and students of its school, she drew upon her unique occult, spiritual and practical experience to answer their questions. The topics range from the spiritually elevated and philosophically complex to the practical and mundane. Taken as a whole, the conversations offer an uplifting vision of human existence. In the Mother’s view, we are destined to outgrow our limited ego-centric personalities, discover our true selves, and ultimately create a divine life on earth.

The compilation covers a broad range of subjects in considerable depth, taking up many issues that are rarely treated elsewhere. Yet the general tone of the conversations is informal and intimate. There are many long passages in which the Mother brings in personal anecdotes, side stories and touches of humour. As she speaks, her personality comes out and the reader becomes, as it were, a member of the class, listening as she instructs and guides those gathered before her.


Book Details

Author: The Mother (Mirra Alfassa)
Print Length: 629
Publisher: Sri Aurobindo Ashram
Original source: https://agendamother.wordpress.com/
Submitted by: House of the Mother’s Agenda
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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Light to Superlight

Light to Superlight

There are twenty-six letters in this series, written between 1912 and 1921, all addressed to Sri Motilal Roy except the second one, which was to Anandrao. Sri Aurobindo’s letters of this period are not only of gripping national interest to his countrymen, but are of vaster importance to a greater humanity that could read in them the extraordinary evolution of a meteoric patriot-politician emerging out of his ten years’ veil to become the renowned architect of The Life Divine. It may be helpful to unknowing readers better to understand the situation in which he wrote those letters, with a little contextual preliminary background, which we shall try to supply here, briefly.


Book Details

Author: Arun Chandra Dutt
Print Length: 245
Publisher: Sri Krishna Prosad Ghosh from Prabartak Publishers
Original source: http://motherandsriaurobindo.in/
Submitted by: Blindshiva
Contributors: Blindshiva
Book format: Pdf
Language: English
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The Yoga of the Bhagavat Gita by Sri Krishna Prem

The Yoga of Bhagavat Gita

The Yoga of the Bhagavat Gita

This book is a complete commentary on the Bhagavat Gita written by Sri Krishna Prem in 1937. Originally published as a series of articles in The Aryan Path, this material was revised and published in book form in 1938 and subsequently revised again in 1948. This is a masterful presentation of the Gita, clearly written by one who knows whereof he speaks. The author has also managed to demonstrate the parallels and commonalities this material has with Buddhism without overwhelming the primary strains of the Gita with extraneous material. This book also contains a glossary of Sanskrit terms used within and several appendices which help provide a broader understanding of the Gita and its context.


Book Details

Author: Sri Krishna Prem
Print Length:
Publisher: Penguin Books Inc.
Submitted by: Blindshiva
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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Wings of the Sea

Wings of the Sea

MISCELLANEOUS WRITINGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS
FROM YEAR 72-73 (2016-2017) OF A LIFE
(INCLUDING 14 SHORT ESSAYS ON ‘SAVITRI’ PUBLISHED IN THE CRESTONE EAGLE)

AUTHOR’S NOTE: In 1968 the Mother gave me a hard-bound ream of hand-made paper, bound in the Ashram Press, where I was working. I was too naive at the time to fully appreciate the gesture. But I have continued to write. A first collection of poems, written from 1968 to 1977, many of which she read, was published in 1998 and dedicated to Matrimandir. One of those poems was produced as a play in Auroville, in the early years, to which she actually sent a busload of ashramites.

I have lived in Auroville for half of the past 50 years, and written hundreds of pages of philosophy. But I have also traveled to many other wonderful places, both physically and spiritually. And it is in that simple moment of clarity when poems are written that such experiences can sometimes be captured and, hopefully, conveyed to anyone who can listen and see. This small collection, mostly written in the 50th year,is dedicated to Auroville, which continues to inspire.


Book Details

Author: Rod Hemsell
Print Length: 50
Publisher: Auro e-Books
Contributor: Krishna
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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50 Poems from Auroville

50 Poems from Auroville

This is an anthology of 50 poems written in the last 50 years, as a gift and tribute to Auroville on the 50th anniversary of its founding on 28th February 1968.

The poems are by Aurovilians, former Aurovilians and those involved with or who have been in some way touched by Auroville or The Mother and Sri Aurobindo. The selection includes poems previously published in various Auroville and private collections together with poems recently submitted in response to a request in Auroville News and Notes.

Not all the poems in this anthology are the product of openness to higher planes of consciousness, or are even necessarily ‘spiritual’. Some express a deep yearning for a life to be lived in oneness with the consciousness of the truth of things and the spirit. Some have been included because they convey vividly a sense of truth or honesty or strongly evoke a sense of connection with the place or scene we may have experienced, or tell us something about the Auroville experience. Or they simply have an appealing poetic quality.


Book Details

Author: Compilation of aurovilian poets done by Vikas (Alan Vickers)
Print Length: 43
Publisher: Vikas (Alan Vickers)
Contributor: Krishna
Book format: Pdf, ePub, mobi (Kindle)
Language: English
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My Pilgrimage to the Spirit

My Pilgrimage to the Spirit

My Pilgrimage to the Spirit by Dr. Govindbhai Patel is the book of his experiences in sadhana in Sri Aurobindo Ashram as well as in his life outside, while following an ideal of Sri Aurobindo– “All life is Yoga.” The book therefore is significantly divided mainly in two parts. The first part covers his Yogic experiences and visions guided by the Divine Grace in the form of letters by the Divine Master of Yoga in Sri Aurobindo Ashram. The second part covers his experiences in the thick of life outside, guided by the Divine Grace, which gives a touch of originality and uniqueness to the book, for it is the first book of its type which contains author’s experiences outside the Ashram, moulding his life with care, by the touch of the Grace and fulfilling it into a stream of dedicated pilgrimage. Here we have the pleasure to see, how skilfully the door of the human life which is a paradox, is opened by the key of the Divine Grace, turning it into a fulfilment of life as a dedicated pilgrimage. “Life is a paradox, with God for key.”


Book Details

Author: Dr. Govindbhai Patel

Print Length: 169

Publisher:  Sri Aurobindo Ashram Publication Department

Original source: http://sabda.sriaurobindoashram.org

Contributor: Blindshiva

Book format: PDF, ePub, Kindle

Language: English

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The Philosophy of Consciousness: Hegel and Sri Aurobindo

The Philosophy of Consciousness: Hegel and Sri Aurobindo

The Philosophy of Consciousness:
Hegel and Sri Aurobindo

An investigation into the nature and evolution of consciousness through the lens of various philosophers, culminating with the experiential philosophy of Sri Aurobindo.

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Sri Aurobindo’s Correspondence with Govindbhai Patel

Sri Aurobindo's Correspondence with Govindbhai Patel

Sri Aurobindo’s Correspondence
with Govindbhai Patel

This is a small collection of the correspondence between Sri Aurobindo and one of his disciples, Govindbhai Patel, covering the years 1928 thru 1934.


Book Details

Author: Sri Aurobindo

Print Length: 68 (Taken number pages in pdf document)

Publisher: Auro e-Books

Contributor: Blindshiva

Book format: PDF, ePub, Kindle

Language: English

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The Candle of Vision

The Candle of Vision

The Candle of Vision

In Letters on Poetry and Art, Sri Aurobindo spoke of A. E. many times as a poet and a mystic. In a letter dated 5 February 1932, Sri Aurobindo said:

“A. E.’s remarks about “immensity” etc. are very interesting to me; for these are the very words, with others like them, that are constantly recurring at short intervals in my poetry when I express, not spiritual thought, but spiritual experience. I knew perfectly well that this recurrence would be objected to as bad technique or an inadmissible technique; but this seems to me a reasoning from the conventions of a past order which cannot apply to a new poetry dealing with spiritual things. A new art of words written from a new consciousness demands a new technique. A.E. himself admits that this rule makes a great difficulty because these “high light” words are few in the English language. This solution may do well enough for him, because the realisations which they represent are in him mental realisations or intuitions occurring on the summits of the consciousness, rare “high lights” over the low tones of the ordinary natural or occult experience (ordinary, of course, to him, not to the average man), and so his solution does not violate the truth of his vision, does not misrepresent the balance or harmony of its natural tones. But what of one who lives in an atmosphere full of these high lights—in a consciousness in which the finite, not only the occult but even the earthly finite is bathed in the sense of the eternal, the illimitable and infinite, the immensities or intimacies of the timeless. To follow A.E.’s rule might well mean to falsify this atmosphere, to substitute a merely aesthetic fabrication for a true seeing and experience. Truth first—a technique expressive of the truth in the forms of beauty has to be found, if it does not exist. It is no use arguing from the spiritual inadequacy of the English language; the inadequacy does not exist and, even if it did, the language will have to be made adequate. It has been plastic enough in the past to succeed in expressing all that it was asked to express, however new; it must now be urged to a new progress. In fact, the power is there and has only to be brought out more fully to serve the full occult, mystic, spiritual purpose.”

This book by Irish author, poet, painter and mystic George William Russell, is a set of transcendent essays on Celtic mysticism. Known by his pen name AE (which is short for Aeon), Russell was friends with many other figures of the Celtic renaissance of the early 20th century, including Y.B. Yeats, and James Stephens.

The Candle of Vision describes Russells’ luminous excursions into the otherworld, including clairvoyant and prophetic visions, precognition of Gnostic concepts, past-life and astral journeys, and, always, heightened awareness of the beauty that pervades mundane reality. Russell describes encounters with what today we would call UFOs, and attempts to construct a private Kabala based on an intuitive reconstuction of a primal language and alphabet. Lastly, he attempts to put a mystical gloss on the primeval Celtic pagan deities. Lovers of Celtic lore and ecstatic mystic literature will both find much to enjoy in this short book.

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Letters on Poetry and Art

sri-aurobindo-cwsa-vol27-letters-on-poetry-and-art-cover

Letters on Poetry and Art

Letters on Poetry and Art comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on poetry and other forms of literature, painting and the other arts, beauty, aesthetics and the relation of these to the practice of yoga. He wrote most of these letters to members of his ashram during the 1930s and 1940s, primarily between 1931 and 1937. Only around a sixth of the letters were published during his lifetime. The rest have been transcribed from his manuscripts.

The present volume is the first collection of Sri Aurobindo’s letters on poetry, literature, art and aesthetics to bear the title Letters on Poetry and Art. It incorporates material from three previous books: (1) Letters on Poetry, Literature and Art; (2) Letters on “Savitri”, and (3) On Himself (section entitled “The Poet and the Critic”). It also contains around five hundred letters that have not appeared in any previous collection published under his name. The arrangement is that of the editors. The texts of the letters have been checked against all available manuscripts and printed versions.


Book Details

Author: Sri Aurobindo

Print Length: 781 pages

Publisher: Sri Aurobindo Ashram

Contributor: Blindshiva, Alexey, Krishna

Book format: PDF, ePub, Kindle

Language: English


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Contents

Part One. Poetry and Its Creation

Section One, The Sources of Poetry

  • Poetic Creation
  • Sources of Inspiration
  • Overhead Poetry
  • Examples of Overhead Poetry

Section Two, The Poetry of the Spirit

  • Psychic, Mystic and Spiritual Poetry
  • Poet, Yogi, Rishi, Prophet, Genius
  • The Poet and the Poem

Section Three, Poetic Technique

  • Technique, Inspiration, Artistry
  • Rhythm
  • English Metres
  • Greek and Latin Classical Metres
  • Quantitative Metre in English and Bengali
  • Metrical Experiments in Bengali
  • Rhyme
  • English Poetic Forms
  • Substance, Style, Diction
  • Grades of Perfection in Poetic Style
  • Examples of Grades of Perfection in Poetic Style

Section Four, Translation

  • Translation: Theory
  • Translation: Practice

Part Two. On His Own and Others’ Poetry

Section One, On His Poetry and Poetic Method

  • Inspiration, Effort, Development
  • Early Poetic Influences
  • On Early Translations and Poems
  • On Poems Published in Ahana and Other Poems
  • Metrical Experiments
  • On Some Poems Written during the 1930s
  • On Savitri
  • Comments on Some Remarks by a Critic
  • On the Publication of His Poetry

Section Two, On Poets and Poetry

  • Great Poets of the World
  • Remarks on Individual Poets
  • Comments on Some Examples of Western Poetry (up to 1900)
  • Twentieth-Century Poetry
  • Comments on Examples of Twentieth-Century Poetry
  • Indian Poetry in English
  • Poets of the Ashram
  • Comments on the Work of Poets of the Ashram
  • Philosophers, Intellectuals, Novelists and Musicians
  • Comments on Some Passages of Prose

Section Three, Practical Guidance for Aspiring Writers

  • Guidance in Writing Poetry
  • Guidance in Writing Prose
  • Remarks on English Pronunciation
  • Remarks on English Usage
  • Remarks on Bengali Usage

Part Three. Literature, Art, Beauty and Yoga

Section One, Appreciation of Poetry and the Arts

  • Appreciation of Poetry
  • Appreciation of the Arts in General
  • Comparison of the Arts
  • Appreciation of Music

Section Two, On the Visual Arts

  • General Remarks on the Visual Arts
  • Problems of the Painter
  • Painting in the Ashram

Section Three, Beauty and Its Appreciation

  • General Remarks on Beauty
  • Appreciation of Beauty

Section Four, Literature, Art, Music and the Practice of Yoga

  • Literature and Yoga
  • Painting, Music, Dance and Yoga

Appendixes

  • Appendix I
  • Appendix II
  • Appendix III

Note on the Texts


 Sample

Letters on Poetry and Art

Three Elements of Poetic Creation

Poetry, or at any rate a truly poetic poetry, comes always from some subtle plane through the creative vital and uses the outer mind and other external instruments for transmission only. There are three elements in the production of poetry; there is the original source of inspiration, there is the vital force of creative beauty which contributes its own substance and impetus and often determines the form, except when that also comes ready made from the original sources; there is, finally, the transmitting outer consciousness of the poet. The most genuine and perfect poetry is written when the original source is able to throw its inspiration pure and undiminished into the vital and there takes its true native form and power of speech exactly reproducing the inspiration, while the outer consciousness is entirely passive and transmits without alteration what it receives from the godheads of the inner or the superior spaces. When the vital mind and emotion are too active and give too much of their own initiation or a translation into more or less turbid vital stuff, the poetry remains powerful but is inferior in quality and less authentic. Finally, if the outer consciousness is too lethargic and blocks the transmission or too active and makes its own version, then you have the poetry that fails or is at best a creditable mental manufacture. It is the interference of these two parts either by obstruction or by too great an activity of their own or by both together that causes the difficulty and labour of writing. There would be no difficulty if the inspiration came through without obstruction or interference in a pure transcript — that is what happens in a poet’s highest or freest moments when he writes not at all out of his own external human mind, but by inspiration, as the mouthpiece of the Gods.

The originating source may be anywhere; the poetry may arise or descend from the subtle physical plane, from the higher or lower vital itself, from the dynamic or creative intelligence, from the plane of dynamic vision, from the psychic, from the illumined mind or Intuition, — even, though this is the rarest, from the Overmind widenesses. To get the Overmind inspiration is so rare that there are only a few lines or short passages in all poetic literature that give at least some appearance or reflection of it. When the source of inspiration is in the heart or the psychic there is more easily a good will in the vital channel, the flow is spontaneous; the inspiration takes at once its true form and speech and is transmitted without any interference or only a minimum of interference by the brain-mind, that great spoiler of the higher or deeper splendours. It is the character of the lyrical inspiration, to flow in a jet out of the being — whether it comes from the vital or the psychic, it is usually spontaneous, for these are the two most powerfully impelling and compelling parts of the nature. When on the contrary the source of inspiration is in the creative poetic intelligence or even the higher mind or the illumined mind, the poetry which comes from this quarter is always apt to be arrested by the outer intellect, our habitual thought-production engine. This intellect is an absurdly overactive part of the nature; it always thinks that nothing can be well done unless it puts its finger into the pie and therefore it instinctively interferes with the inspiration, blocks half or more than half of it and labours to substitute its own inferior and toilsome productions for the true speech and rhythm that ought to have come. The poet labours in anguish to get the one true word, the authentic rhythm, the real divine substance of what he has to say, while all the time it is waiting complete and ready behind; but it is denied free transmission by some part of the transmitting agency which prefers to translate and is not willing merely to receive and transcribe. When one gets something through from the illumined mind, then there is likely to come to birth work that is really fine and great. When there comes with labour or without it something reasonably like what the poetic intelligence wanted to say, then there is something fine or adequate, though it may not be great unless there is an intervention from the higher levels. But when the outer brain is at work trying to fashion out of itself or to give its own version of what the higher sources are trying to pour down, then there results a manufacture or something quite inadequate or faulty or, at the best, “good on the whole”, but not the thing that ought to have come.

2 June 1931

Creation by the Word

The word is a sound expressive of the idea. In the supra-physical plane when an idea has to be realised, one can by repeating the word-expression of it, produce vibrations which prepare the mind for the realisation of the idea. That is the principle of the Mantra and of japa. One repeats the name of the Divine and the vibrations created in the consciousness prepare the realisation of the Divine. It is the same idea that is expressed in the Bible, “God said, Let there be Light, and there was Light.” It is creation by the Word.

6 May 1933

The Secret of the Veda

The Secret of the Veda

The Secret of the Veda

with Selected Hymns

Essays on the Rig Veda and its mystic symbolism, with translations of selected hymns. These writings on and translations of the Rig Veda were published in the monthly review Arya between 1914 and 1920. Most of them appeared there under three headings: The Secret of the Veda, “Selected Hymns” and “Hymns of the Atris”. Other translations that did not appear under any of these headings make up the final part of the volume.

In August 1914, Sri Aurobindo began to publish The Secret of the Veda in the first issue of the philosophical review Arya. This series was accompanied by a related one, Selected Hymns. Selected Hymns was followed a year later by Hymns of the Atris. These works, written and published in monthly instalments between 1914 and 1917, form Parts One to Three of the present volume.

Besides Selected Hymns and Hymns of the Atris, other Vedic translations appeared in the Arya at various times between 1915 and 1920. They were usually introduced when a page or two had to be filled at the end of a 64-page issue. These translations have been placed in the order of their original publication in Part Four, “Other Hymns”.

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Sriaurobindopanishad

Sri Aurobindo Upanishad

Sriaurobindopanishad

This Upanishad was written by Sri Aurobindo during the early part of his stay in Pondicherry (1910-1914). It was first published in the journal Sri Aurobindo: Archives and Research in December 1978 with English translation done by Sri Jagannath Vedalankar.


Book Details

Author: Sri Aurobindo

Print Length: 25 pages

Text source: sanskrit.sriaurobindoashram.org.in

Publisher: Sri Aurobindo Ashram

Contributors: Blindshiva, Manipadma, Sergio Fedrigo, Krishna

Book format: PDF, ePub, Kindle

Language: Devanagari, English


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This book is also available in Italian Language


Contents

  • Preface
  • Sanskrit Text
  • English Text

Sample

Sriaurobindopanishad

There is Brahman alone, the One without a second. Being and non-being are its forms and It is also beyond Being and Non-Being. There is nothing else except That. All that is contained in the three times and all that is beyond the three times is indeed that One Brahman alone. Whatever is in the universe, small or large, noble or mean, is Brahman alone, Brahman alone. The world is also Brahman. It is true, not false.

That alone is the Transcendent Being, beyond all the three times, beyond all the worlds, penetrating all the worlds, beyond Being, beyond Non-Being, All-Being, All-Consciousness, All-Bliss, without beginning and end, the eternal Divine.

He is without quality and supports all qualities. He has qualities, infinite qualities, and enjoys the state of being without quality. He Himself transcends the state of being without qualities and the state of being with qualities. He is neither without quality nor with quality because He is One and Single.

Questions and Answers 1950–1951 (Collected Works of The Mother Volume 4)

Questions and Answers 1950–1951 (CWM Volume 4)

Questions and Answers 1950–1951

Collected Works of the Mother Volume 4

This volume consists of talks given by the Mother in 1950 and 1951 to the students of her French class as well as some sadhaks of the Ashram. She usually began by reading out a passage from one of her works or her French translation of one of Sri Aurobindo’s works, and then invited questions. During this period the Mother discussed several of her recent essays on education, her conversations of 1929, some letters of Sri Aurobindo and his small book The Mother.

It is worth tracing the origin of the Mother’s French class, in which these talks were given. The Ashram school was founded by the Mother in 1943, and by the end of the decade its first students had learned French fairly well. As more and more children joined the school, there were not enough teachers in French. When the new school year began in December 1950, the Mother decided to take the highest class in French three times a week. At first she spoke to the students and some of the teachers, but gradually many sadhaks of the Ashram were allowed to join the class. As a result, the questions they asked arose from many different levels of understanding.

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Questions and Answers 1929–1931 (Collected Works of The Mother Volume 3)

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Questions and Answers 1929–1931

Collected Works of the Mother Volume 3

Conversations about Yoga and life. The Mother answered questions raised by disciples in 1929 and 1930–1931. The volume also includes her commentaries on The Dhammapada, with a translation of that text.

This volume includes two early collections of conversations by the Mother and her oral commentaries on the Dhammapada. The conversations were spoken in English; the commentaries were spoken in French and appear here in English translation.

Questions and Answers 1929. In 1929 the Mother met weekly with a small group of disciples. After a period of meditation she answered questions raised by them. Most of these questions were asked by an Englishwoman who was living in the Ashram at that time. One of those present noted down the conversations immediately afterwards and later sent a copy of fifteen of them to Sri Aurobindo, who revised them for publication. They were first brought out for private circulation in 1931.

Questions and Answers 1930-1931. During 1930 and 1931 the Mother spoke with a group of disciples who met with her in a room of the Ashram known as Prosperity. One of the participants recorded some of these conversations in abbreviated long-hand and later elaborated his notes. These reports were not revised by Sri Aurobindo or the Mother, but the Mother did approve of their publication and made a French translation. They were first published as a book in 1951.

Commentaries on the Dhammapada. The Mother gave these commentaries on the Buddhist teachings of the Dhammapada between August 1957 and September 1958. She was speaking to a large gathering of Ashram members and students of the Ashram school, members of her “Friday class” at the Ashram Playground. After reading out a chapter of the text, the Mother spoke about the points that interested her and then asked the class to meditate on them. She did not comment systematically on the Dhammapada verses, but she did cover most of the central ideas of the text.

Appendix to Questions and Answers 1929. This appendix contains Sri Aurobindo’s explanations of certain phrases and passages in Questions and Answers 1929. They were written to various disciples between 1933 and 1937.

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